Zero Article.

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    nuhru_1098
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    Registration date : 2008-07-15

    Post Zero Article.

    Post by nuhru_1098 on Thu Nov 06, 2008 11:11 pm

    The Zero Article

    No article is needed before abstract nouns used in a general sense.
    Love is all you need.
    Crime is a growing problem in the inner cities.

    No article is needed for most places consisting of just the name of a person, or the name of a person/place followed by a noun.
    Harrods, Macys, McDonald's, Lloyds Bank, St. Paul's Cathedral, Buckingham Palace, Kennedy Airport, Waterloo Station, Cambridge University, etc.

    No article is usually needed in front of company names. Cisco Systems, Microsoft, CBS, EMI, Hitachi, Lufthansa, etc

    An article is unnecessary in official job titles, if there is only one person holding this position at any given time.
    Compare:
    Alistair Darling is (the) Chancellor of the Exchequer.
    Alistair Darling is a cabinet minister.

    No article is needed in front of most roads, streets, parks, squares or bridges.
    Queen's Road, Oxford Street, Central Park, Times Square, Tower Bridge, etc.

    No article is needed in the names of single mountains.
    While in New Zealand I climbed Mount Cook.

    No article is needed before the names of meals, unless it is a formal occasion.
    Compare:
    Roger had breakfast in his hotel room.
    I attended a dinner at the Rotary Club.

    No article is needed for the names of games or sports.
    Anna Kournikova plays tennis to keep in shape.

    No article is needed before bed, church, court, hospital, prison, school, college, university, etc. when these are used for their primary purpose.

    If, however, they are used for any other purposes,the is required.
    She stayed in bed on Sunday instead of going to church.
    The dissatisfied customer threatened to take him to court.
    The dissident was released from prison.
    After graduating from high school he went to university.

    Compare:

    She sat on the bed while she changed her socks.
    He entered the church to photograph its interior.
    The decorators forgot a ladder in the prison and the place was empty when they came back for it.

    Articles are not needed in more abstract expressions of situation like to/at sea, to/at/out of work, in/out of town, in/out of office, etc.


    If, however, you start talking about somewhere concrete or some place in particular, then the definite article the is required.
    My uncle first went to sea at the age of 15. He used to spend months at sea.
    I go to work every day. I was at work yesterday.
    Jack's been out of work for almost a year.
    What's on in town (= my local town) this weekend?
    Julie's out of town (= the town she lives in) until Thursday.
    This government has been in office for about a year now. The opposition parties would dearly love to vote them out of office.

    Compare:

    I went to the sea/seaside to swim.
    I stayed by the sea/seaside all day.
    What's on in the town (= a particular town, not necessarily my own) this weekend?
    How do I get out of the town?
    Sally spent all day in the office (= her workplace). She didn't get out of the office much before 7 o'clock.

    No article is needed before television as a medium, only as an appliance. Carol saw her brother on television.

    Compare:

    She had an indoor antenna on the television.

    There is no article before a noun followed by a categorizing letter or number.
    The students have just read section C.
    The Chicago train is about to depart from track 5.
    Her flight leaves from gate 32.
    He fell asleep on page 816 of "War and Peace".
    She is staying in room 689.

    To give added punch, articles are often dropped in the titles of books, movies, music and other works of art.
    Even if an article exists in the original title, as in J.R.R. Tolkien's 'The Lord of the Rings', people tend to omit this when making reference to it in everyday speech or writing.
    "Journey into Hell" sounds even more exciting than "The Journey into Hell".
    "Have you read 'Lord of the Rings'?"

    In order to save space, articles are usually dropped in headlines. "Iraqi Head Seeks Arms"
    "Stolen Painting Found by Tree"
    "Police Confirm Shotgun Attack
    on Bullet Train"

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